Lipreading Ability and Its Cognitive Correlates in Typically Developing Children and Children With Specific Language Impairment Purpose Lipreading and its cognitive correlates were studied in school-age children with typical language development and delayed language development due to specific language impairment (SLI). Method Forty-two children with typical language development and 20 children with SLI were tested by using a word-level lipreading test and an extensive ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2017
Lipreading Ability and Its Cognitive Correlates in Typically Developing Children and Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenni Heikkilä
    Division of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Eila Lonka
    Division of Logopedics, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Sanna Ahola
    Division of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Auli Meronen
    Niilo Mäki Institute, Jyväskylä, Finland
  • Kaisa Tiippana
    Division of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jenni Heikkilä: jenni.heikkila@helsinki.fi
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers
    Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers×
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2017
Lipreading Ability and Its Cognitive Correlates in Typically Developing Children and Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 485-493. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0071
History: Received February 17, 2015 , Revised October 30, 2015 , Accepted April 28, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 485-493. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0071
History: Received February 17, 2015; Revised October 30, 2015; Accepted April 28, 2016

Purpose Lipreading and its cognitive correlates were studied in school-age children with typical language development and delayed language development due to specific language impairment (SLI).

Method Forty-two children with typical language development and 20 children with SLI were tested by using a word-level lipreading test and an extensive battery of standardized cognitive and linguistic tests.

Results Children with SLI were poorer lipreaders than their typically developing peers. Good phonological skills were associated with skilled lipreading in both typically developing children and in children with SLI. Lipreading was also found to correlate with several cognitive skills, for example, short-term memory capacity and verbal motor skills.

Conclusions Speech processing deficits in SLI extend also to the perception of visual speech. Lipreading performance was associated with phonological skills. Poor lipreading in children with SLI may be, thus, related to problems in phonological processing.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by grants from the University of Helsinki, awarded to Kaisa Tiippana, and Arvo and Lea Ylppö Foundation, Finland, awarded to Jenni Heikkilä. We are grateful to the University of Jyväskylä and Valteri Centre for Learning and Consulting, Onerva, Jyväskylä, Finland, and to the pupils and teachers in Valteri School Onerva, Jyväskylä, Finland, and Töölö Primary School, Helsinki, Finland, where the research was conducted.
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