Influence of Cognitive Ability on Therapy Outcomes for Anomia in Adults With Chronic Poststroke Aphasia Purpose The relationship between cognitive abilities and aphasia rehabilitation outcomes is complex and remains poorly understood. This study investigated the influence of language and cognitive abilities on anomia therapy outcomes in adults with aphasia. Method Thirty-four adults with chronic aphasia participated in Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2017
Influence of Cognitive Ability on Therapy Outcomes for Anomia in Adults With Chronic Poststroke Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jade Dignam
    The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
    National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • David Copland
    The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
    National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Kate O'Brien
    The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston, Queensland, Australia
  • Penni Burfein
    Speech Pathology Department, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia
  • Asaduzzaman Khan
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
  • Amy D. Rodriguez
    The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Herston, Queensland, Australia
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia
    National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jade Dignam: j.dignam@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Blake
    Associate Editor: Margaret Blake×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2017
Influence of Cognitive Ability on Therapy Outcomes for Anomia in Adults With Chronic Poststroke Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2017, Vol. 60, 406-421. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0384
History: Received November 5, 2015 , Revised March 17, 2016 , Accepted July 15, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2017, Vol. 60, 406-421. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0384
History: Received November 5, 2015; Revised March 17, 2016; Accepted July 15, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The relationship between cognitive abilities and aphasia rehabilitation outcomes is complex and remains poorly understood. This study investigated the influence of language and cognitive abilities on anomia therapy outcomes in adults with aphasia.

Method Thirty-four adults with chronic aphasia participated in Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy. A language and cognitive assessment battery, including 3 baseline naming probes, was administered prior to therapy. Naming accuracy for 30 treated and 30 untreated items was collected at posttherapy and 1-month follow-up. Multiple regression models were computed to evaluate the relationship between language and cognitive abilities at baseline and anomia therapy outcomes.

Results Both language and cognitive variables significantly influenced anomia therapy gains. Verbal short-term memory ability significantly predicted naming gains for treated items at posttherapy (β = −.551, p = .002) and for untreated items at posttherapy (β = .456, p = .014) and 1-month follow-up (β = .455, p = .021). Furthermore, lexical-semantic processing significantly predicted naming gains for treated items at posttherapy (β = −.496, p = .004) and 1-month follow-up (β = .545, p = .012).

Conclusions Our findings suggest that individuals' cognitive ability, specifically verbal short-term memory, affects anomia treatment success. Further research into the relationship between cognitive ability and anomia therapy outcomes may help to optimize treatment techniques.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Aphasia Rehabilitation under Grant # 569935, a Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital Foundation grant, and a Speech Pathology Australia postgraduate research grant. David Copland was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship and a University of Queensland Vice Chancellor's Fellowship.
The Communication Research Registry is acknowledged as a source of participant recruitment. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the research sites, including Prince of Wales Hospital (Randwick, New South Wales [NSW]), the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (Herston, Queensland), Royal Rehabilitation (Ryde, NSW), and St. George Hospital (Kogarah, NSW). Last, we would like to acknowledge the people with aphasia and their family members for participating in the program.
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