Characterization of Vocal Fold Vibration in Sulcus Vocalis Using High-Speed Digital Imaging Purpose The aim of the present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize vocal fold vibrations in sulcus vocalis by high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) and to clarify the correlations between HSDI-derived parameters and traditional vocal parameters. Method HSDI was performed in 20 vocally healthy subjects (8 men and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2017
Characterization of Vocal Fold Vibration in Sulcus Vocalis Using High-Speed Digital Imaging
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Akihito Yamauchi
    Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Japan
  • Hisayuki Yokonishi
    Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Metropolitan Police Hospital, Japan
  • Hiroshi Imagawa
    Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Japan
  • Ken-Ichi Sakakibara
    Department of Communication Disorders, The Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
  • Takaharu Nito
    Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Japan
  • Niro Tayama
    Department of Otolaryngology and Tracheo-esophagology, The National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tatsuya Yamasoba
    Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Japan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Akihito Yamauchi: drachilles23@yahoo.co.jp
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Dimitar Deliyski
    Associate Editor: Dimitar Deliyski×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2017
Characterization of Vocal Fold Vibration in Sulcus Vocalis Using High-Speed Digital Imaging
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 24-37. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0285
History: Received October 10, 2014 , Revised April 5, 2015 , Accepted July 7, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 24-37. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0285
History: Received October 10, 2014; Revised April 5, 2015; Accepted July 7, 2016

Purpose The aim of the present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize vocal fold vibrations in sulcus vocalis by high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) and to clarify the correlations between HSDI-derived parameters and traditional vocal parameters.

Method HSDI was performed in 20 vocally healthy subjects (8 men and 12 women) and 41 patients with sulcus vocalis (33 men and 8 women). Then HSDI data were evaluated by assessing the visual–perceptual rating, digital kymography, and glottal area waveform.

Results Patients with sulcus vocalis frequently had spindle-shaped glottal gaps and a decreased mucosal wave. Compared with the control group, the sulcus vocalis group showed higher open quotient as well as a shorter duration of the visible mucosal wave, a smaller speed index, and a smaller glottal area difference index ([maximal glottal area – minimal glottal area]/maximal glottal area). These parameters deteriorated in order of the control group and Type I, II, and III sulcus vocalis. There were no gender-related differences. Strong correlations were noted between the open quotient and the type of sulcus vocalis.

Conclusions HSDI was an effective method for documenting the characteristics of vocal fold vibrations in patients with sulcus vocalis and estimating the severity of dysphonia.

Acknowledgment
This research was not funded by any organization or grant. There are no conflicts of interest to be disclosed. This research was presented in the Eighth East Asian Conference on Phonosurgery held in Jeju, Korea, from November 30 to December 1, 2012.
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