A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia Purpose Because reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia. Method We tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2017
A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ana A. Francisco
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Alexandra Jesse
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Margriet A. Groen
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • James M. McQueen
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ana A. Francisco: claraafrancisco@gmail.com
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers
    Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers×
  • Alexandra Jesse and Margriet A. Groen contributed equally to this article.
    Alexandra Jesse and Margriet A. Groen contributed equally to this article.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2017
A General Audiovisual Temporal Processing Deficit in Adult Readers With Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 144-158. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0375
History: Received October 29, 2015 , Revised April 18, 2016 , Accepted May 26, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 144-158. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0375
History: Received October 29, 2015; Revised April 18, 2016; Accepted May 26, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Because reading is an audiovisual process, reading impairment may reflect an audiovisual processing deficit. The aim of the present study was to test the existence and scope of such a deficit in adult readers with dyslexia.

Method We tested 39 typical readers and 51 adult readers with dyslexia on their sensitivity to the simultaneity of audiovisual speech and nonspeech stimuli, their time window of audiovisual integration for speech (using incongruent /aCa/ syllables), and their audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.

Results Adult readers with dyslexia showed less sensitivity to audiovisual simultaneity than typical readers for both speech and nonspeech events. We found no differences between readers with dyslexia and typical readers in the temporal window of integration for audiovisual speech or in the audiovisual perception of phonetic categories.

Conclusions The results suggest an audiovisual temporal deficit in dyslexia that is not specific to speech-related events. But the differences found for audiovisual temporal sensitivity did not translate into a deficit in audiovisual speech perception. Hence, there seems to be a hiatus between simultaneity judgment and perception, suggesting a multisensory system that uses different mechanisms across tasks. Alternatively, it is possible that the audiovisual deficit in dyslexia is only observable when explicit judgments about audiovisual simultaneity are required.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Innovational Research Incentives Scheme Veni Grant 275-89-017 from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (awarded to Margriet A. Groen). A preliminary report of this experiment appeared as Francisco, Jesse, Groen, & McQueen (2014) . We wish to thank all participants for their cooperation.
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