Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises Purpose The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous communication. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2017
Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenny Iwarsson
    Speech Pathology and Audiology, Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen South, Denmark
  • David Jackson Morris
    Speech Pathology and Audiology, Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen South, Denmark
  • Laura Winther Balling
    Department of International Business Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jenny Iwarsson: jiwarsson@hum.ku.dk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor and Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2017
Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 1-12. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0235
History: Received July 6, 2015 , Revised December 1, 2015 , Accepted May 4, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2017, Vol. 60, 1-12. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0235
History: Received July 6, 2015; Revised December 1, 2015; Accepted May 4, 2016

Purpose The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous communication.

Method Twelve subjects produced speech in 3 conditions: rote speech (weekdays), sentences in a set form, and semispontaneous speech. Subjects simultaneously performed a secondary visual discrimination task for which response times were measured. On completion of each speech task, subjects rated their experience on a questionnaire.

Results Response times from the secondary, visual task were found to be shortest for the rote speech, longer for the semispontaneous speech, and longest for the sentences within the set framework. Principal components derived from the subjective ratings were found to be linked to response times on the secondary visual task. Acoustic measures reflecting fundamental frequency distribution and vocal fold compression varied across the speech tasks.

Conclusions The results indicate that consideration should be given to the selection of speech tasks during the process leading to automation of revised speech behavior and that self-reports may be a reliable index of cognitive load.

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