Estimating Subglottal Pressure From Neck-Surface Acceleration During Normal Voice Production Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for estimating subglottal air pressure using a neck-surface accelerometer and to compare the accuracy of predicting subglottal air pressure relative to predicting acoustic sound pressure level (SPL). Method Indirect estimates of subglottal pressure (Psg′) were obtained from ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2016
Estimating Subglottal Pressure From Neck-Surface Acceleration During Normal Voice Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amanda S. Fryd
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Surgery & Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Daryush D. Mehta: daryush.mehta@alum.mit.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Nelson Roy
    Associate Editor: Nelson Roy×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 2016
Estimating Subglottal Pressure From Neck-Surface Acceleration During Normal Voice Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1335-1345. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0430
History: Received December 14, 2015 , Revised March 10, 2016 , Accepted May 6, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1335-1345. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0430
History: Received December 14, 2015; Revised March 10, 2016; Accepted May 6, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for estimating subglottal air pressure using a neck-surface accelerometer and to compare the accuracy of predicting subglottal air pressure relative to predicting acoustic sound pressure level (SPL).

Method Indirect estimates of subglottal pressure (Psg′) were obtained from 10 vocally healthy speakers during loud-to-soft repetitions of 3 different /p/–vowel gestures (/pa/, /pi/, /pu/) at 3 pitch levels in the modal register. Intraoral air pressure, neck-surface acceleration, and radiated acoustic pressure were recorded, and the root-mean-square amplitude of the acceleration signal was correlated with Psg′ and SPL.

Results The coefficient of determination between accelerometer level and Psg′ was high when data were pooled from all vowel and pitch contexts for each participant (r 2 = .68–.93). These relationships were stronger than corresponding relationships between accelerometer level and SPL (r 2 = .46–.81). The average 95% prediction interval for estimating Psg′ using accelerometer level was ±2.53 cm H2O, ranging from ±1.70 to ±3.74 cm H2O across participants.

Conclusions Accelerometer signal amplitude correlated more strongly with Psg′ than with SPL. Future work is warranted to investigate the robustness of the relationship in nonmodal voice qualities, individuals with voice disorders, and accelerometer-based ambulatory monitoring of subglottal pressure.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Voice Health Institute and National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R33 DC011588 (awarded to Robert E. Hillman). Contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank J. T. Heaton for scientific discussions and feedback on earlier versions of the manuscript. Portions of this work were presented in the Master's thesis of the first author (Fryd, 2015).
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