Vocabulary Development in European Portuguese: A Replication Study Using the Language Development Survey Purpose Our objective was to replicate previous cross-linguistic findings by comparing Portuguese and U.S. children with respect to (a) effects of language, gender, and age on vocabulary size; (b) lexical composition; and (c) late talking. Method We used the Language Development Survey (LDS; Rescorla, 1989) with children (18–35 ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2016
Vocabulary Development in European Portuguese: A Replication Study Using the Language Development Survey
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie Rescorla
    Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Josephine Nyame
    University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
  • Pedro Dias
    Universidade Católica Portuguesa Centre for Studies in Human Development, Porto, Portugal
  • Disclosure: Leslie Rescorla receives royalties from the sale of the Language Development Survey (LDS) in English. Pedro Dias receives royalties from the sale of the LDS in Portuguese. Josephine Nyame declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: Leslie Rescorla receives royalties from the sale of the Language Development Survey (LDS) in English. Pedro Dias receives royalties from the sale of the LDS in Portuguese. Josephine Nyame declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Leslie Rescorla: lrescorl@brynmawr.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 2016
Vocabulary Development in European Portuguese: A Replication Study Using the Language Development Survey
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1484-1490. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0294
History: Received August 25, 2015 , Revised January 4, 2016 , Accepted May 13, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1484-1490. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0294
History: Received August 25, 2015; Revised January 4, 2016; Accepted May 13, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Our objective was to replicate previous cross-linguistic findings by comparing Portuguese and U.S. children with respect to (a) effects of language, gender, and age on vocabulary size; (b) lexical composition; and (c) late talking.

Method We used the Language Development Survey (LDS; Rescorla, 1989) with children (18–35 months) learning European Portuguese (n = 181) and English (n = 206).

Results In both languages, girls had higher vocabulary scores than boys and vocabulary scores increased with age. Portuguese LDS scores were significantly lower than English scores, but the effect size was small. Cross-linguistic concordance of percentage use scores yielded a Q correlation of .50, with 64 of the “top 100” words being exact matches. Cross-linguistic concordance was highest for the youngest age group. In both languages, vocabulary composition in late talkers (children ≥ 24 months with < 50 words) was highly correlated with composition in vocabulary size-matched younger children.

Conclusions Results replicated previous Greek, Korean, and Italian LDS studies. The early lexicons of typical talkers and late talkers contained many of the same words, indicating considerable universality and suggesting good targets for clinical intervention.

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