The Relationship Between Relative Fundamental Frequency and a Kinematic Estimate of Laryngeal Stiffness in Healthy Adults Purpose This study examined the relationship between the acoustic measure relative fundamental frequency (RFF) and a kinematic estimate of laryngeal stiffness. Method Twelve healthy adults (mean age = 22.7 years, SD = 4.4; 10 women, 2 men) produced repetitions of /ifi/ while varying their vocal effort during simultaneous ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2016
The Relationship Between Relative Fundamental Frequency and a Kinematic Estimate of Laryngeal Stiffness in Healthy Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria S. McKenna
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Elizabeth S. Heller Murray
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Yu-An S. Lien
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Victoria S. McKenna: vmckenna@bu.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Nelson Roy
    Editor and Associate Editor: Nelson Roy×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2016
The Relationship Between Relative Fundamental Frequency and a Kinematic Estimate of Laryngeal Stiffness in Healthy Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1283-1294. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0406
History: Received November 24, 2015 , Revised February 21, 2016 , Accepted May 2, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1283-1294. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0406
History: Received November 24, 2015; Revised February 21, 2016; Accepted May 2, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study examined the relationship between the acoustic measure relative fundamental frequency (RFF) and a kinematic estimate of laryngeal stiffness.

Method Twelve healthy adults (mean age = 22.7 years, SD = 4.4; 10 women, 2 men) produced repetitions of /ifi/ while varying their vocal effort during simultaneous acoustic and video nasendoscopic recordings. RFF was determined from the last 10 voicing cycles before the voiceless obstruent (RFF offset) and the first 10 cycles of revoicing (RFF onset). A kinematic stiffness ratio was calculated for the vocal fold adductory gesture during revoicing by normalizing the maximum angular velocity by the maximum glottic angle during the voiceless obstruent.

Results A linear mixed effect model indicated that RFF offset and onset were significant predictors of the kinematic stiffness ratios. The model accounted for 52% of the variance in the kinematic data. Individual relationships between RFF and kinematic stiffness ratios varied across participants, with at least moderate negative correlations in 83% of participants for RFF offset but only 40% of participants for RFF onset.

Conclusions RFF significantly predicted kinematic estimates of laryngeal stiffness in healthy speakers and has the potential to be a useful clinical indicator of laryngeal tension. Further research is needed in individuals with voice disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC012651. We thank Carolyn Michener, Talia Mittelman, and Meredith Cler of Boston University for their assistance with data processing.
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