Involvement of the Central Cognitive Mechanism in Word Production in Adults Who Stutter Purpose The study examined whether semantic and phonological encoding processes were capacity demanding, involving the central cognitive mechanism, in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and NS) to better understand the role of cognitive demand in linguistic processing and stuttering. We asked (a) whether the two linguistic processes ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2016
Involvement of the Central Cognitive Mechanism in Word Production in Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pei-Tzu Tsai
    San José State University
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland at College Park
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Pei-Tzu Tsai: peitzu.tsai@sjsu.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2016
Involvement of the Central Cognitive Mechanism in Word Production in Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1269-1282. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0224
History: Received August 14, 2014 , Revised March 30, 2015 , Accepted March 9, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1269-1282. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0224
History: Received August 14, 2014; Revised March 30, 2015; Accepted March 9, 2016

Purpose The study examined whether semantic and phonological encoding processes were capacity demanding, involving the central cognitive mechanism, in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and NS) to better understand the role of cognitive demand in linguistic processing and stuttering. We asked (a) whether the two linguistic processes in AWS are capacity demanding, which can temporally disrupt the processing of a concurrent nonlinguistic task, and (b) whether AWS and NS show similar patterns of temporal disruption in the two processes.

Method Twenty AWS and 20 matched NS participated in the study. We examined semantic interference and phonological facilitation effects, using the picture–word interference paradigm, under concurrent and sequential processing of a secondary, nonlinguistic task.

Results Both AWS and NS showed statistically significant semantic interference and phonological facilitation effects, and both effects caused temporal disruption to the processing of a secondary task to the predicted extent.

Conclusions The observed result patterns in both AWS and NS suggest that both semantic and phonological encoding processes are capacity demanding and can be vulnerable to concurrent processing demands. This finding on NS is inconsistent with the current literature on young, fluent adults and warrants further investigation.

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