An Item Analysis of the French Version of the Test for Reception of Grammar Among Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome or Intellectual Disability of Undifferentiated Etiology Purpose An item analysis of Bishop's (1983)  Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG) in its French version (F-TROG; Lecocq, 1996) was conducted to determine whether the difficulty of items is similar for participants with or without intellectual disability (ID). Method In Study 1, responses to the 92 F-TROG ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
An Item Analysis of the French Version of the Test for Reception of Grammar Among Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome or Intellectual Disability of Undifferentiated Etiology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruno Facon
    Univ. Lille, CNRS, CHU Lille, UMR 9193 - SCALab, F-59000 Lille, France
  • David Magis
    University of Liège, Belgium
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Bruno Facon: bruno.facon@univ-lille3.fr
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
An Item Analysis of the French Version of the Test for Reception of Grammar Among Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome or Intellectual Disability of Undifferentiated Etiology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1190-1197. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0179
History: Received May 14, 2015 , Revised October 23, 2015 , Accepted April 17, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1190-1197. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0179
History: Received May 14, 2015; Revised October 23, 2015; Accepted April 17, 2016

Purpose An item analysis of Bishop's (1983)  Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG) in its French version (F-TROG; Lecocq, 1996) was conducted to determine whether the difficulty of items is similar for participants with or without intellectual disability (ID).

Method In Study 1, responses to the 92 F-TROG items by 55 participants with Down syndrome (DS), 55 with ID of undifferentiated etiology (UND), and 55 typical children (TYP) matched on their F-TROG total score were compared using the transformed item difficulties method, a statistical approach designed to detect differential item functioning (DIF) between groups. In Study 2, an additional comparison involving 526 TYP participants and 526 participants with UND was conducted to increase the statistical power of the analysis.

Results The difficulty of items was highly similar whatever the sample size or clinical status of participants. Fewer than 3.5% of the items were flagged as showing DIF.

Conclusions Tests such as the TROG can be used with confidence in clinical practice as well as in research studies comparing participants with or without ID. Methods designed for investigating potential internal test bias—such as done here—should be more regularly employed in the developmental disability field to affirm the absence of DIF.

Acknowledgment
We are grateful to John M. Belmont for his helpful comments on this article. We also thank the students and psychologists who helped with data collection. We extend our deepest gratitude to the special education facilities and schools that permitted us to conduct this study and to all the children and adolescents who participated. This work was supported by a grant from the French National Research Agency (Agence Nationale de la Recherche, LANG & HANDICAPS, Project No. ANR-09-ENFT-019). David Magis is a Research Associate of the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique FNRS (Belgium). Neither of the authors has any conflicts of interest with any company or other organization regarding the material discussed in the article.
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