A Framework for Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition Tests: Effects of Bilingualism and Socioeconomic Status on Children's Performance Purpose As a recognized indicator of language impairment, nonword repetition has unique potential for distinguishing language impairment from difficulties due to limited experience and knowledge of a language. This study focused on a new Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition framework, comprising 3 tests that vary the phonological characteristics of nonwords, in the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
A Framework for Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition Tests: Effects of Bilingualism and Socioeconomic Status on Children's Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shula Chiat
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Kamila Polišenská
    The University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Shula Chiat: shula.chiat.1@city.ac.uk
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Gray
    Associate Editor: Shelley Gray×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
A Framework for Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition Tests: Effects of Bilingualism and Socioeconomic Status on Children's Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1179-1189. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0293
History: Received August 22, 2015 , Revised December 7, 2015 , Accepted April 5, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1179-1189. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0293
History: Received August 22, 2015; Revised December 7, 2015; Accepted April 5, 2016

Purpose As a recognized indicator of language impairment, nonword repetition has unique potential for distinguishing language impairment from difficulties due to limited experience and knowledge of a language. This study focused on a new Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition framework, comprising 3 tests that vary the phonological characteristics of nonwords, in the quest for an assessment that minimizes effects of language experience and knowledge and thereby maximizes potential for assessing children with diverse linguistic experience.

Method The English version of the new framework was administered, with a test of receptive vocabulary, to 4- to 7-year-old monolingual and bilingual children with typical development (n = 21 per group) from neighborhoods with midhigh and low socioeconomic status (SES).

Results Receptive vocabulary was affected by both bilingualism and neighborhood SES. In contrast, no effects of bilingualism or neighborhood SES were found on 2 of our nonword repetition tests, whereas the most language-specific test yielded a borderline effect of neighborhood SES but no effect of bilingualism.

Conclusions The findings support the potential of the new tests for assessing children regardless of lingual or socioeconomic background. They also highlight the importance of considering the characteristics of nonword targets and investigating the compound influence of bilingualism and SES on different language assessments.

Acknowledgments
We thank Roshni Patel and Omobolanle Ogunbanke for recording the CL-NWR tests, Roshni Patel and Adriana Sanchez for help with data collection, and Amna Arfin-Hyder for interrater reliability checks. The development of the nonword repetition tests reported in this Research Note was supported by COST Action IS0804, Language Impairment in a Multilingual Society: Linguistic Patterns and the Road to Assessment (http://www.bi-sli.org).
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