Articulatory Control in Childhood Apraxia of Speech in a Novel Word–Learning Task Purpose Articulatory control and speech production accuracy were examined in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and typically developing (TD) controls within a novel word–learning task to better understand the influence of planning and programming deficits in the production of unfamiliar words. Method Participants included 16 children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2016
Articulatory Control in Childhood Apraxia of Speech in a Novel Word–Learning Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Case
    New York University
  • Maria I. Grigos
    New York University
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Julie Case: julie.case@nyu.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Ben A. M. Maassen
    Associate Editor: Ben A. M. Maassen×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2016
Articulatory Control in Childhood Apraxia of Speech in a Novel Word–Learning Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1253-1268. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0261
History: Received September 17, 2014 , Revised March 30, 2015 , Accepted February 11, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2016, Vol. 59, 1253-1268. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-14-0261
History: Received September 17, 2014; Revised March 30, 2015; Accepted February 11, 2016

Purpose Articulatory control and speech production accuracy were examined in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and typically developing (TD) controls within a novel word–learning task to better understand the influence of planning and programming deficits in the production of unfamiliar words.

Method Participants included 16 children between the ages of 5 and 6 years (8 CAS, 8 TD). Short- and long-term changes in lip and jaw movement, consonant and vowel accuracy, and token-to-token consistency were measured for 2 novel words that differed in articulatory complexity.

Results Children with CAS displayed short- and long-term changes in consonant accuracy and consistency. Lip and jaw movements did not change over time. Jaw movement duration was longer in children with CAS than in TD controls. Movement stability differed between low- and high-complexity words in both groups.

Conclusions Children with CAS displayed a learning effect for consonant accuracy and consistency. Lack of change in movement stability may indicate that children with CAS require additional practice to demonstrate changes in speech motor control, even within production of novel word targets with greater consonant and vowel accuracy and consistency. The longer movement duration observed in children with CAS is believed to give children additional time to plan and program movements within a novel skill.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by funding from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03DC009079 (awarded to Maria Grigos) and the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (awarded to Maria Grigos and Julie Case). The authors acknowledge Hailey Small, Penelope Elias, Lauren Perry, Panagiota Tampakis, Allison Zinski, Rachel Kloss, Dina Kospetas, and Zuzana Lion for assistance with data collection and processing. We also thank Harriet Klein and Susannah Levi for their comments on earlier versions of this article. We are grateful to the participants and their families for their cooperation and dedication to the project.
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