Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry Purpose This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry. Method Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2016
Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meredith J. Cler
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Yu-An S. Lien
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Maia N. Braden
    Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Voice and Swallow Clinics, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Talia Mittelman
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Kerri Downing
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Cara E. Stepp: cstepp@bu.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Editor and Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   October 01, 2016
Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1018-1024. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0407
History: Received November 24, 2015 , Revised January 29, 2016 , Accepted February 1, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1018-1024. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0407
History: Received November 24, 2015; Revised January 29, 2016; Accepted February 1, 2016

Purpose This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry.

Method Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone and nasal accelerometer signals were collected during the production of /pɑpɑpɑpɑ/ speech utterances by 25 children with and without cleft palate. Fourteen inexperienced raters listened to the microphone signals from the pediatric speakers and rated the samples for the severity of NAE using direct magnitude estimation. Mean listener ratings were compared to a novel quantitative measurement of NAE derived from the nasal acceleration signals.

Results Correlation between the nasal acceleration energy measure and the measured nasal airflow was high (r = .87). Correlation between the measure and auditory-perceptual ratings was moderate (r = .49).

Conclusion The measure presented here is quantitative and noninvasive, and the required hardware is inexpensive ($150). Future studies will include speakers with a wider range of NAE severity and etiology, including cleft palate, hearing impairment, or dysarthria. Further development will also involve validation of the measure against airflow measures across subjects.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by grants to Cara Stepp from the Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund and Grant DC012651 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, as well as by a grant to Maia Braden through the Diane M. Bless Endowed Chair, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery at University of Wisconsin–Madison. The authors would like to thank Victoria McKenna, Joseph Mendoza, and Carolyn Michener for their assistance.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access