Clinical Characteristics of Voice, Speech, and Swallowing Disorders in Oromandibular Dystonia Purpose To better define the clinical characteristics of idiopathic oromandibular dystonia, we studied voice, speech, and swallowing disorders and their impact on activities of daily living. Method Fourteen consecutive patients with idiopathic oromandibular dystonia and 14 matched, healthy control subjects were included in the study. Results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2016
Clinical Characteristics of Voice, Speech, and Swallowing Disorders in Oromandibular Dystonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexandre Kreisler
    Lille University Medical Center, France
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 1172, Lille, France
  • Anne-Caroline Verpraet
    Lille University Medical Center, France
  • Solène Veit
    Lille University Medical Center, France
  • Odile Pennel-Ployart
    Lille University Medical Center, France
  • Hélène Béhal
    Lille University, France
  • Alain Duhamel
    Lille University, France
  • Alain Destée
    Lille University Medical Center, France
    Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 1172, Lille, France
  • Disclosure: Alexandre Kreisler received honoraria from Allergan France SAS, Ipsen Pharma, and Merz Pharma France, and has displayed expert testimony for Allergan France SAS, Ipsen Pharma, and Merz Pharma France during the past 3 years. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: Alexandre Kreisler received honoraria from Allergan France SAS, Ipsen Pharma, and Merz Pharma France, and has displayed expert testimony for Allergan France SAS, Ipsen Pharma, and Merz Pharma France during the past 3 years. The other authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Alexandre Kreisler, MD, PhD: alexandre.kreisler@chru-lille.fr
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling
    Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2016
Clinical Characteristics of Voice, Speech, and Swallowing Disorders in Oromandibular Dystonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 940-949. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0169
History: Received May 6, 2015 , Revised December 2, 2015 , Accepted January 8, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 940-949. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0169
History: Received May 6, 2015; Revised December 2, 2015; Accepted January 8, 2016

Purpose To better define the clinical characteristics of idiopathic oromandibular dystonia, we studied voice, speech, and swallowing disorders and their impact on activities of daily living.

Method Fourteen consecutive patients with idiopathic oromandibular dystonia and 14 matched, healthy control subjects were included in the study.

Results Dysarthria was the most common disorder and its characteristics varied from one patient to another. However, we frequently observed a hyperkinetic, dysarthric profile characterized by imprecise consonants, a rough voice, changes in intensity, and hypernasality. Dysphagia appeared to be slightly less frequent and less disabling than dysarthria. Most patients had difficulty swallowing solids, and the oral phase was particularly problematic. Dysarthria and dysphagia affected activities of daily living in general and the psychological/emotional domain in particular.

Conclusions The characteristics of dysarthria in oromandibular dystonia vary significantly from one patient to another due to differences in the set of affected muscles, so each patient should receive a personalized rehabilitation program. Dysarthria was the most prominent symptom, although spasmodic dysphonia was more frequent than expected. Further laboratory-based studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms and consequences of dysphagia in oromandibular dystonia.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by a grant from Ipsen Pharma, France, awarded to the Association pour le Développement de la Recherche et de l’Innovation dans le Nord Pas-de-Calais (ADRINORD). The authors wish to thank Dr. David Fraser (Biotech Communication, Damery, France) for editorial assistance. Authors' roles: The study was designed by A. Kreisler, A.-C. Verpraet, S. Veit, O. Pennel-Ployart, and A. Duhamel. Recruitment and neurological examinations were performed by A. Kreisler. Voice, speech, and swallowing disorders were studied by A.-C. Verpraet, S. Veit, and O. Pennel-Ployart. Statistical analyses were performed by H. Béhal and A. Duhamel. All the authors contributed equally to the interpretation of data. Although the manuscript was drafted mainly by A. Kreisler, all the authors revised it for critical content.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access