A Brief Version of the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering Scales: The UTBAS-6 Purpose A significant proportion of adults who stutter experience anxiety in social and speaking situations. The Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering (UTBAS) scales provide a comprehensive measure of the unhelpful cognitions associated with social anxiety in stuttering. However, reducing the number of UTBAS items would make it ideal as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2016
A Brief Version of the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering Scales: The UTBAS-6
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Iverach
    Centre for Emotional Health, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia
  • Rob Heard
    Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ross Menzies
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Robyn Lowe
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Sue O'Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Lisa Iverach is now affiliated with the Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
    Lisa Iverach is now affiliated with the Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.×
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2016
A Brief Version of the Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering Scales: The UTBAS-6
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 964-972. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0167
History: Received May 4, 2015 , Revised October 8, 2015 , Accepted December 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 964-972. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0167
History: Received May 4, 2015; Revised October 8, 2015; Accepted December 21, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose A significant proportion of adults who stutter experience anxiety in social and speaking situations. The Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs About Stuttering (UTBAS) scales provide a comprehensive measure of the unhelpful cognitions associated with social anxiety in stuttering. However, reducing the number of UTBAS items would make it ideal as a brief screening instrument. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a brief version of the full UTBAS scales.

Method The 66-item UTBAS scales were completed by 337 adults who stutter. Item reduction was used to determine a smaller set of items that could adequately reproduce the total score for each full UTBAS scale.

Results Item reduction resulted in the inclusion of six items for the brief UTBAS-6 scales. Decile ranges for scores on the brief UTBAS-6 provide reliable estimates of the full UTBAS scores and valuable clinical information about whether a psychological assessment is warranted.

Conclusions The brief UTBAS-6 provides a reliable and efficient means of screening the unhelpful thoughts and beliefs associated with speech-related anxiety among adults who stutter. Referral for a psychological assessment is recommended in cases where the UTBAS total score falls in or above the fifth decile.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, including Grants 402763 and 633007 awarded to the Australian Stuttering Research Centre at the University of Sydney, and an Australian Research Fellowship (1052216) awarded to Lisa Iverach.
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