Glimpsing Speech in the Presence of Nonsimultaneous Amplitude Modulations From a Competing Talker: Effect of Modulation Rate, Age, and Hearing Loss Purpose This study investigated how listeners process acoustic cues preserved during sentences interrupted by nonsimultaneous noise that was amplitude modulated by a competing talker. Method Younger adults with normal hearing and older adults with normal or impaired hearing listened to sentences with consonants or vowels replaced with noise ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2016
Glimpsing Speech in the Presence of Nonsimultaneous Amplitude Modulations From a Competing Talker: Effect of Modulation Rate, Age, and Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Fogerty
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Jayne B. Ahlstrom
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • William J. Bologna
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Judy R. Dubno
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to: Daniel Fogerty: fogerty@sc.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers
    Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2016
Glimpsing Speech in the Presence of Nonsimultaneous Amplitude Modulations From a Competing Talker: Effect of Modulation Rate, Age, and Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1198-1207. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0259
History: Received July 22, 2015 , Revised November 18, 2015 , Accepted January 4, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2016, Vol. 59, 1198-1207. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0259
History: Received July 22, 2015; Revised November 18, 2015; Accepted January 4, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study investigated how listeners process acoustic cues preserved during sentences interrupted by nonsimultaneous noise that was amplitude modulated by a competing talker.

Method Younger adults with normal hearing and older adults with normal or impaired hearing listened to sentences with consonants or vowels replaced with noise amplitude modulated by a competing talker. Sentences were spectrally shaped according to individual audiograms or to the mean audiogram from the listeners with hearing impairment for a younger spectrally shaped control group. The modulation spectrum of the noise was low-pass filtered at different modulation cutoff frequencies. The effect of noise level was also examined.

Results Performance declined when nonsimultaneous masker modulation included faster rates and was maximized when masker modulation matched the preserved primary speech modulation. Vowels resulted in better performance compared with consonants at slower modulation cutoff rates, likely due to suprasegmental features. Poorer overall performance was observed with increased age or hearing loss, and for listeners who received spectrally shaped speech.

Conclusions Nonsimultaneous amplitude modulations from a competing talker significantly interacted with the preserved speech segment, and additional listener factors were observed for age and hearing loss. Importantly, listeners may obtain benefit from nonsimultaneous competing modulations when they match the preserved modulations of the sentence.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by an Advancing Academic-Research Career Award through the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and by National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R03 DC012506 (awarded to Daniel Fogerty) and R01 DC000184 (awarded to Judy R. Dubno). This work was also supported by the South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute (NIH Grant UL1 RR0299882). This investigation was partially conducted in a facility constructed with support from Research Facilities Improvement Program Grant C06 RR14516 from the NIH National Center for Research Resources.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access