Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if patient characteristics or clinical variables could predict who benefits from individual auditory training. Method A retrospective series of analyses were performed using a data set from a large, multisite, randomized controlled clinical trial that compared the treatment effects ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   August 01, 2016
Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherri L. Smith
    Auditory Vestibular Research Enhancement Award Program, Mountain Home VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN
    East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Gabrielle H. Saunders
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, OR
    Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland
  • Theresa H. Chisolm
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Melissa Frederick
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, OR
  • Beth A. Bailey
    James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sherri L. Smith: sherri.smith@va.gov
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Forum: New Directions for Auditory Training
Research Forum   |   August 01, 2016
Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 876-886. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0162
History: Received May 1, 2015 , Revised October 2, 2015 , Accepted December 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 876-886. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0162
History: Received May 1, 2015; Revised October 2, 2015; Accepted December 21, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if patient characteristics or clinical variables could predict who benefits from individual auditory training.

Method A retrospective series of analyses were performed using a data set from a large, multisite, randomized controlled clinical trial that compared the treatment effects of at-home auditory training programs in bilateral hearing aid users. The treatment arms were (a) use of the 20-day computerized Listening and Communication Enhancement program, (b) use of the 10-day digital versatile disc Listening and Communication Enhancement program, (c) use of a placebo “books-on-tape” training, and (d) educational counseling (active control). Multiple linear regression models using data from 263 participants were conducted to determine if patient and clinical variables predicted short-term improvement on word-recognition-in-noise abilities, self-reported hearing handicap, and self-reported hearing problems.

Results Baseline performance significantly predicted performance on each variable, explaining 11%–17% of the variance in improvement. The treatment arm failed to emerge as a significant predictor with other clinical variables explaining less than 9% of the variance.

Conclusion These results suggest that hearing aid users who have poorer aided word-recognition-in-noise scores and greater residual activity limitations and participation restrictions will show the largest improvement in these areas.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Review Grant C6303R, awarded to the first three authors. Additional support was provided via a Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Career Development Award (Grant C6394W) to Sherri L. Smith, a Center of Excellence Award (National Center of Rehabilitative Auditory Research Grant C9230C) to Gabrielle H. Saunders, and a Research Enhancement Award Program (Auditory Vestibular REAP Grant C9221F) to Sherri L. Smith. The data collection efforts of Cassie Boyle (Bay Pines) and Melissa Anderson (Mountain Home) are acknowledged. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government.
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