Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2016
Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kensi M. Cobb
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Andrew Stuart: stuarta@ecu.edu. Kensi M. Cobb is now at Duke Otolaryngology of Raleigh, NC.
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy
    Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 2016
Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 853-859. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0182
History: Received May 15, 2015 , Revised August 31, 2015 , Accepted December 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 853-859. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0182
History: Received May 15, 2015; Revised August 31, 2015; Accepted December 21, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults.

Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level (nHL). The lowest stimulus intensity level at which a wave V was identifiable and replicable was considered the ABR threshold.

Results ABR thresholds to air-conducted CE-Chirps were 9.8 dB nHL for neonates and adults. ABR thresholds to bone-conducted CE-Chirps were 3.8 and 13.8 dB nHL for neonates and adults, respectively. The difference in ABR thresholds to bone-conducted CE-Chirps was significantly different (p < .0001, ηp 2 = .45). Adults had significantly larger wave V amplitudes to air- (p < .0001, ηp 2 = .50) and bone-conducted (p = .013, ηp 2 = .15) CE-Chirps at a stimulus intensity of 30 dB nHL. At the same intensity, adults evidenced significantly shorter wave V latencies (p < .0001, ηp 2 = .49) only with air-conducted CE-chirps.

Conclusion The difference in ABR thresholds and wave V latencies to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps between neonates and adults may be attributed to a disparity in effective signal delivery to the cochlea.

Acknowledgments
Presented in part at the Hearing Across the Lifespan 2014 Conference, Cernobbio, Italy. Grason-Stadler (Eden Prairie, MN) loaned the evoked potential system used in this study. The assistance of Ron Taylor, Lynn Weatherby, and Sherri Weller at Grason-Stadler is greatly appreciated. The Vidant Medical Center Audiology and Hearing Aid Center staff in Greenville, NC, assisted in coordinating this research.
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