Using ILD or ITD Cues for Sound Source Localization and Speech Understanding in a Complex Listening Environment by Listeners With Bilateral and With Hearing-Preservation Cochlear Implants Purpose To assess the role of interaural time differences and interaural level differences in (a) sound-source localization, and (b) speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment for listeners with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) and for listeners with hearing-preservation CIs. Methods Eleven bilateral listeners with MED-EL (Durham, NC) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
Using ILD or ITD Cues for Sound Source Localization and Speech Understanding in a Complex Listening Environment by Listeners With Bilateral and With Hearing-Preservation Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Louise H. Loiselle
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
  • Michael F. Dorman
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
  • William A. Yost
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
  • Sarah J. Cook
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
  • Rene H. Gifford
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Louise H. Loiselle: lhloiselle@gmail.com
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Richard Dowell
    Associate Editor: Richard Dowell×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
Using ILD or ITD Cues for Sound Source Localization and Speech Understanding in a Complex Listening Environment by Listeners With Bilateral and With Hearing-Preservation Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 810-818. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0355
History: Received December 19, 2014 , Revised May 28, 2015 , Accepted September 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 810-818. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0355
History: Received December 19, 2014; Revised May 28, 2015; Accepted September 21, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose To assess the role of interaural time differences and interaural level differences in (a) sound-source localization, and (b) speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment for listeners with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) and for listeners with hearing-preservation CIs.

Methods Eleven bilateral listeners with MED-EL (Durham, NC) CIs and 8 listeners with hearing-preservation CIs with symmetrical low frequency, acoustic hearing using the MED-EL or Cochlear device were evaluated using 2 tests designed to task binaural hearing, localization, and a simulated cocktail party. Access to interaural cues for localization was constrained by the use of low-pass, high-pass, and wideband noise stimuli.

Results Sound-source localization accuracy for listeners with bilateral CIs in response to the high-pass noise stimulus and sound-source localization accuracy for the listeners with hearing-preservation CIs in response to the low-pass noise stimulus did not differ significantly. Speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment improved for all listeners when interaural cues, either interaural time difference or interaural level difference, were available.

Conclusions The findings of the current study indicate that similar degrees of benefit to sound-source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments are possible with 2 very different rehabilitation strategies: the provision of bilateral CIs and the preservation of hearing.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders Grant F31DC011684 (awarded to Louise H. Loiselle) and by the MED-EL Corporation (awarded to Louise H. Loiselle); by National Institutes of Health Grants NIH-R-01-DC-010821 (awarded to Michael F. Dorman), and NIH-R-01-DC-009404 (awarded to Rene H. Gifford); and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant FA9550-12-1-0312 (awarded to William A. Yost).
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