Sentence Processing in Traumatic Brain Injury: Evidence From the P600 Purpose Sentence processing can be affected following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to linguistic or cognitive deficits. Language-related event-related potentials (ERPs), particularly the P600, have not been described in individuals with TBI history. Method Four young adults with a history of closed head injury participated. Two had ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
Sentence Processing in Traumatic Brain Injury: Evidence From the P600
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah E. Key-DeLyria
    Portland State University, Oregon
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sarah E. Key-DeLyria: keydel@pdx.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Andrew Whitehouse
    Associate Editor: Andrew Whitehouse×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
Sentence Processing in Traumatic Brain Injury: Evidence From the P600
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 759-771. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0104
History: Received May 17, 2015 , Revised August 18, 2015 , Accepted November 29, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 759-771. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0104
History: Received May 17, 2015; Revised August 18, 2015; Accepted November 29, 2015

Purpose Sentence processing can be affected following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to linguistic or cognitive deficits. Language-related event-related potentials (ERPs), particularly the P600, have not been described in individuals with TBI history.

Method Four young adults with a history of closed head injury participated. Two had severe injuries, and 2 had mild–moderate injuries more than 24 months prior to testing. ERPs were recorded while participants read sentences designed to be grammatically correct or incorrect. Participants also completed cognitive and sentence comprehension measures.

Results One participant with TBI was significantly different than the control group on several behavioral sentence measures and 1 cognitive measure. However, none of the participants with TBI had a reliable P600 effect. Nonparametric bootstrapping indicated that the ERP was reliable in 10 control participants but no participants with TBI history.

Conclusions There were few behavioral differences between individuals with TBI history and the control group, though all reported subjective difficulty with reading. The P600 was absent in the TBI group in this study. Given the heterogeneity of individuals with TBI and the difficulty in assessing subtle language impairments, exploring the P600 further may provide useful insight into language processing difficulties.

Acknowledgments
This research was part of the author's doctoral dissertation at the University of Florida. Many thanks to Lori Altmann, Edith Kaan, H. Wind Cowles, William Perlstein, and Linda Lombardino for their support of the dissertation work. Thanks also to Jaclyn Grill and Ashley Atkinson for making the trek up and down the one hill through the swamp to help collect data. Thanks also to Lauren Ficker and Krivo Flores for their help with preparing the article.
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