Pantomime Production by People With Aphasia: What Are Influencing Factors? Purpose The present article aimed to inform clinical practice on whether people with aphasia (PWA) deploy pantomime techniques similarly to participants without brain damage (PWBD) and if not, what factors influence these differences. Method We compared 38 PWA to 20 PWBD in their use of 6 representation techniques ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
Pantomime Production by People With Aphasia: What Are Influencing Factors?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karin van Nispen
    Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands
  • Mieke van de Sandt-Koenderman
    Rijndam Rehabilitation Center, RoNeRes, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
    Erasmus MC, Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Lisette Mol
    Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands
  • Emiel Krahmer
    Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Karin van Nispen; k.vannispen@uvt.nl
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Blake
    Associate Editor: Margaret Blake×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
Pantomime Production by People With Aphasia: What Are Influencing Factors?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 745-758. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0166
History: Received May 4, 2015 , Revised July 3, 2015 , Accepted November 2, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 745-758. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0166
History: Received May 4, 2015; Revised July 3, 2015; Accepted November 2, 2015

Purpose The present article aimed to inform clinical practice on whether people with aphasia (PWA) deploy pantomime techniques similarly to participants without brain damage (PWBD) and if not, what factors influence these differences.

Method We compared 38 PWA to 20 PWBD in their use of 6 representation techniques (handling, enact, object, shape, deictic, and other) when pantomiming objects, and determined whether PWA used the same defaults as PWBD. We assessed the influence of (non-)dominant arm use, ideomotor apraxia, semantic processing, aphasia severity, and oral naming.

Results PWA used various pantomime techniques. Enact, deictic, and other were used infrequently. No differences were found for the use of shape techniques, but PWA used fewer handling and object techniques than PWBD and they did not use these for the same objects as PWBD did. No influence was found for (non-)dominant arm use. All other variables correlated with the use of handling, object, and defaults.

Conclusion In our study, PWA were able to use various pantomime techniques. As a group, they used these techniques differently from PWBD and relied more heavily on the use of shape techniques. This was not influenced by a hemiparesis, but seemed dependent on semantic processing. Clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank all participants who selflessly took part in this study. We are very grateful for the cooperation of Rijndam Rehabilitation Center, Libra Rehabilitation Medicine and Audiology, and the aphasia centers of Heliomare (Afasiecentrum Heliomare), de Zellingen (Afasiecentrum Rotterdam e.o.), and Siza (Afasiecentrum Tilburg). Furthermore, we would like to thank Anique Gelens, Esther Voogd, and Robin van den Berg for their help with the second coding of the data.
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