Initial Stop Voicing in Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants and Their Typically Developing Peers With Normal Hearing Purpose This study focuses on stop voicing differentiation in bilingual children with normal hearing (NH) and their bilingual peers with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs). Method Twenty-two bilingual children participated in our study (11 with NH, M age = 5;1 [years;months], and 11 with CIs, M ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
Initial Stop Voicing in Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants and Their Typically Developing Peers With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ferenc Bunta
    University of Houston, TX
  • C. Elizabeth Goodin-Mayeda
    University of Houston, TX
  • Amanda Procter
    University of Houston, TX
  • Arturo Hernandez
    University of Houston, TX
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ferenc Bunta: fbunta@uh.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Ewa Jacewicz
    Associate Editor: Ewa Jacewicz×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
Initial Stop Voicing in Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants and Their Typically Developing Peers With Normal Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 686-698. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0212
History: Received June 11, 2015 , Revised October 19, 2015 , Accepted December 1, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 686-698. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0212
History: Received June 11, 2015; Revised October 19, 2015; Accepted December 1, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study focuses on stop voicing differentiation in bilingual children with normal hearing (NH) and their bilingual peers with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs).

Method Twenty-two bilingual children participated in our study (11 with NH, M age = 5;1 [years;months], and 11 with CIs, M hearing age = 5;1). The groups were matched on hearing age and a range of demographic variables. Single-word picture elicitation was used with word-initial singleton stop consonants. Repeated measures analyses of variance with three within-subject factors (language, stop voicing, and stop place of articulation) and one between-subjects factor (NH vs. CI user) were conducted with voice onset time and percentage of prevoiced stops as dependent variables.

Results Main effects were statistically significant for language, stop voicing, and stop place of articulation on both voice onset time and prevoicing. There were no significant main effects for NH versus CI groups. Both children with NH and with CIs differentiated stop voicing in their languages and by stop place of articulation. Stop voicing differentiation was commensurate across the groups of children with NH versus CIs.

Conclusions Stop voicing differentiation is accomplished in a similar fashion by bilingual children with NH and CIs, and both groups differentiate stop voicing in a language-specific fashion.

Acknowledgments
The project described was supported by Grant R03DC012640 (awarded to Ferenc Bunta) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We also want to thank the participants and their parents/legal guardians for choosing to take part in the study. We are grateful for the assistance of Rebecca Gonzalez, Amy Cantu, Hanna Dickson, Jennifer Wickesberg, and the teachers and staff at the Center for Hearing and Speech, Houston, TX.
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