Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease Purpose The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2016
Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Lam
    University at Buffalo, New York
  • Kris Tjaden
    University at Buffalo, New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jennifer Lam: jkyun@buffalo.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Amy Neel
    Associate Editor: Amy Neel×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2016
Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 631-646. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-15-0216
History: Received June 15, 2015 , Revised November 9, 2015 , Accepted November 17, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2016, Vol. 59, 631-646. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-15-0216
History: Received June 15, 2015; Revised November 9, 2015; Accepted November 17, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group.

Method A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different sentences selected from the Sentence Intelligibility Test (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1996). All speakers produced stimuli in 4 speaking conditions (habitual, clear, overenunciate, and hearing impaired). Segmental acoustic measures included vowel space area and first moment (M1) coefficient difference measures for consonant pairs. Second formant slope of diphthongs and measures of vowel and fricative durations were also obtained. Suprasegmental measures included fundamental frequency, sound pressure level, and articulation rate.

Results For the majority of adjustments, all variants of clear speech instruction differed from the habitual condition. The overenunciate condition elicited the greatest magnitude of change for segmental measures (vowel space area, vowel durations) and the slowest articulation rates. The hearing impaired condition elicited the greatest fricative durations and suprasegmental adjustments (fundamental frequency, sound pressure level).

Conclusions Findings have implications for a model of speech production for healthy speakers as well as for speakers with dysarthria. Findings also suggest that particular clear speech instructions may target distinct speech subsystems.

Acknowledgment
This research was conducted as part of the first author's doctoral dissertation, completed at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and was supported by the Mark Diamond Research Fund of the Graduate Student Association at the University at Buffalo and by National Institutes of Health Grant R01DC004689 (second author).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access