The Effect of Auditory Information on Patterns of Intrusions and Reductions Purpose The study investigates whether auditory information affects the nature of intrusion and reduction errors in reiterated speech. These errors are hypothesized to arise as a consequence of autonomous mechanisms to stabilize movement coordination. The specific question addressed is whether this process is affected by auditory information so that it ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2016
The Effect of Auditory Information on Patterns of Intrusions and Reductions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anneke Slis
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Pascal van Lieshout
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Anneke Slis; anneke.slis@alum.utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Lucie Ménard
    Associate Editor: Lucie Ménard×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2016
The Effect of Auditory Information on Patterns of Intrusions and Reductions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2016, Vol. 59, 430-445. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0258
History: Received September 16, 2014 , Revised June 28, 2015 , Accepted October 9, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2016, Vol. 59, 430-445. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0258
History: Received September 16, 2014; Revised June 28, 2015; Accepted October 9, 2015

Purpose The study investigates whether auditory information affects the nature of intrusion and reduction errors in reiterated speech. These errors are hypothesized to arise as a consequence of autonomous mechanisms to stabilize movement coordination. The specific question addressed is whether this process is affected by auditory information so that it will influence the occurrence of intrusions and reductions.

Methods Fifteen speakers produced word pairs with alternating onset consonants and identical rhymes repetitively at a normal and fast speaking rate, in masked and unmasked speech. Movement ranges of the tongue tip, tongue dorsum, and lower lip during onset consonants were retrieved from kinematic data collected with electromagnetic articulography. Reductions and intrusions were defined as statistical outliers from movement range distributions of target and nontarget articulators, respectively.

Results Regardless of masking condition, the number of intrusions and reductions increased during the course of a trial, suggesting movement stabilization. However, compared with unmasked speech, speakers made fewer intrusions in masked speech. The number of reductions was not significantly affected.

Conclusions Masking of auditory information resulted in fewer intrusions, suggesting that speakers were able to pay closer attention to their articulatory movements. This highlights a possible stabilizing role for proprioceptive information in speech movement coordination.

Acknowledgments
The study was supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council grant and partly by funding from the Canada Research Chairs program, both awarded to Pascal van Lieshout. The authors thank Mark Noseworthy for the voice recordings, James Le for his technical support during the EMA sessions, Radu Craioveanu for his help analyzing the data, and Jeffrey Steele and Keren Rice for their valuable comments on earlier versions of the article.
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