Reevaluation of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap Using Item Response Theory Purpose We reevaluated the psychometric properties of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1995) using item response theory. Item response theory describes item functioning along an ability continuum. Method Cross-sectional data from 2,352 adults with and without hearing impairment, ages ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2016
Reevaluation of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap Using Item Response Theory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Mirjam Boeschen Hospers
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Section Ear and Hearing, and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Niels Smits
    University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Cas Smits
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Section Ear and Hearing, and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Mariska Stam
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Section Ear and Hearing, and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Caroline B. Terwee
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Sophia E. Kramer
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Section Ear and Hearing, and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mariska Stam: mari.stam@vumc.nl
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2016
Reevaluation of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap Using Item Response Theory
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 373-383. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0156
History: Received April 30, 2015 , Revised August 26, 2015 , Accepted September 10, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 373-383. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0156
History: Received April 30, 2015; Revised August 26, 2015; Accepted September 10, 2015

Purpose We reevaluated the psychometric properties of the Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (AIADH; Kramer, Kapteyn, Festen, & Tobi, 1995) using item response theory. Item response theory describes item functioning along an ability continuum.

Method Cross-sectional data from 2,352 adults with and without hearing impairment, ages 18–70 years, were analyzed. They completed the AIADH in the web-based prospective cohort study “Netherlands Longitudinal Study on Hearing.” A graded response model was fitted to the AIADH data. Category response curves, item information curves, and the standard error as a function of self-reported hearing ability were plotted.

Results The graded response model showed a good fit. Item information curves were most reliable for adults who reported having hearing disability and less reliable for adults with normal hearing. The standard error plot showed that self-reported hearing ability is most reliably measured for adults reporting mild up to moderate hearing disability.

Conclusions This is one of the few item response theory studies on audiological self-reports. All AIADH items could be hierarchically placed on the self-reported hearing ability continuum, meaning they measure the same construct. This provides a promising basis for developing a clinically useful computerized adaptive test, where item selection adapts to the hearing ability of individuals, resulting in efficient assessment of hearing disability.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank the participants of the Netherlands Longitudinal Study on Hearing. The Netherlands Longitudinal Study on Hearing was financially supported by the Heinsius Houbolt Foundation, and partly funded by Phonak AG, Switzerland. The current study is financially supported by Health Insurance Netherlands.
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