Pediatric Audiology Report: Assessment and Revision of an Audiology Report Written to Parents of Children With Hearing Impairment Objective The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate a typical pediatric diagnostic audiology report to establish its readability and comprehensibility for parents and, second, to revise the report to improve its readability, as well as the comprehension, sense of self-efficacy, and positive opinions of parent readers. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2016
Pediatric Audiology Report: Assessment and Revision of an Audiology Report Written to Parents of Children With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashleigh J. Donald
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell: rebecca.kelly@canterbury.ac.nz
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2016
Pediatric Audiology Report: Assessment and Revision of an Audiology Report Written to Parents of Children With Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 359-372. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0120
History: Received March 28, 2015 , Revised August 2, 2015 , Accepted September 10, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 359-372. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0120
History: Received March 28, 2015; Revised August 2, 2015; Accepted September 10, 2015

Objective The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate a typical pediatric diagnostic audiology report to establish its readability and comprehensibility for parents and, second, to revise the report to improve its readability, as well as the comprehension, sense of self-efficacy, and positive opinions of parent readers.

Method In Experiment 1, a mock audiology report was evaluated via a readability analysis and semistructured interviews with 5 parents. In Experiment 2, the report was revised using best practice guidelines and parental recommendations from Experiment 1. The revision was verified by randomly assigning 32 new parent participants to read either the revised or unrevised report before their comprehension, self-efficacy, and opinions were assessed.

Results In Experiment 1, results confirmed that the report was difficult to read and understand. In Experiment 2, parents who read the revised report had significantly greater comprehension, self-efficacy, and opinion ratings than those who read the unrevised report. In addition, the readability of the revised report was markedly improved compared with the unrevised report.

Conclusions This study shows that pediatric diagnostic audiology reports can be revised to adhere to best practice guidelines and yield improved readability, in addition to improving the comprehension, sense of self-efficacy, and positive opinions of parents of children with hearing impairment.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access