Visual Speech Perception in Children With Language Learning Impairments Purpose The purpose of the study was to assess the ability of children with developmental language learning impairments (LLIs) to use visual speech cues from the talking face. Method In this cross-sectional study, 41 typically developing children (mean age: 8 years 0 months, range: 4 years 5 months ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2016
Visual Speech Perception in Children With Language Learning Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria C. P. Knowland
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Sam Evans
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Caroline Snell
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Stuart Rosen
    University College London, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Victoria C. P. Knowland: victoria.knowland.1@city.ac.uk
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Megha Sundara
    Associate Editor: Megha Sundara×
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2016
Visual Speech Perception in Children With Language Learning Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2016, Vol. 59, 1-14. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0269
History: Received September 29, 2014 , Revised May 31, 2015 , Accepted July 30, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2016, Vol. 59, 1-14. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0269
History: Received September 29, 2014; Revised May 31, 2015; Accepted July 30, 2015

Purpose The purpose of the study was to assess the ability of children with developmental language learning impairments (LLIs) to use visual speech cues from the talking face.

Method In this cross-sectional study, 41 typically developing children (mean age: 8 years 0 months, range: 4 years 5 months to 11 years 10 months) and 27 children with diagnosed LLI (mean age: 8 years 10 months, range: 5 years 2 months to 11 years 6 months) completed a silent speechreading task and a speech-in-noise task with and without visual support from the talking face. The speech-in-noise task involved the identification of a target word in a carrier sentence with a single competing speaker as a masker.

Results Children in the LLI group showed a deficit in speechreading when compared with their typically developing peers. Beyond the single-word level, this deficit became more apparent in older children. On the speech-in-noise task, a substantial benefit of visual cues was found regardless of age or group membership, although the LLI group showed an overall developmental delay in speech perception.

Conclusion Although children with LLI were less accurate than their peers on the speechreading and speech-in noise-tasks, both groups were able to make equivalent use of visual cues to boost performance accuracy when listening in noise.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a fellowship from City University London. We would like to thank Lydia Davis and Ream Katbeh for their assistance with data collection and the schools, parents, and children who were kind enough to participate.
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