Production of Korean Idiomatic Utterances Following Left- and Right-Hemisphere Damage: Acoustic Studies Purpose This study investigates the effects of left- and right-hemisphere damage (LHD and RHD) on the production of idiomatic or literal expressions utilizing acoustic analyses. Method Twenty-one native speakers of Korean with LHD or RHD and in a healthy control (HC) group produced 6 ditropically ambiguous (idiomatic or ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2016
Production of Korean Idiomatic Utterances Following Left- and Right-Hemisphere Damage: Acoustic Studies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Seung-yun Yang
    Touro College, Brooklyn, NY
    Brain and Behavior Laboratory, Geriatrics Division, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY
  • Diana Van Lancker Sidtis
    Brain and Behavior Laboratory, Geriatrics Division, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY
    New York University
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Seung-yun Yang: seung-yun.yang3@touro.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2016
Production of Korean Idiomatic Utterances Following Left- and Right-Hemisphere Damage: Acoustic Studies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 267-280. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0109
History: Received March 19, 2015 , Revised August 26, 2015 , Accepted November 2, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 267-280. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0109
History: Received March 19, 2015; Revised August 26, 2015; Accepted November 2, 2015

Purpose This study investigates the effects of left- and right-hemisphere damage (LHD and RHD) on the production of idiomatic or literal expressions utilizing acoustic analyses.

Method Twenty-one native speakers of Korean with LHD or RHD and in a healthy control (HC) group produced 6 ditropically ambiguous (idiomatic or literal) sentences in 2 different speech tasks: elicitation and repetition. Utterances were analyzed using durational and fundamental-frequency (F0) measures. Listeners' goodness ratings (how well each utterance represented its category: idiomatic or literal) were correlated with acoustic measures.

Results During the elicitation tasks, the LHD group differed significantly from the HC group in durational measures. Significant differences between the RHD and HC groups were seen in F0 measures. However, for the repetition tasks, the LHD and RHD groups produced utterances comparable to the HC group's performance. Using regression analysis, selected F0 cues were found to be significant predictors for goodness ratings by listeners.

Conclusions Using elicitation, speakers in the LHD group were deficient in producing durational cues, whereas RHD negatively affected the production of F0 cues. Performance differed for elicitation and repetition, indicating a task effect. Listeners' goodness ratings were highly correlated with the production of certain acoustic cues. Both the acoustic and functional hypotheses of hemispheric specialization were supported for idiom production.

Acknowledgments
We acknowledge the contributions to this study of John J. Sidtis and the Brain and Behavior Laboratory, Geriatrics Division, Nathan Kline Institute. We appreciate comments from Susannah Levi, Christine Reuterskiold, Harriet Klein, and Gerald Voelbel from New York University. We would especially like to thank study participants at Myungji Choonhey Rehabilitation Hospital in Seoul, South Korea.
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