The Influence of Phonotactic Probability on Nonword Repetition and Fast Mapping in 3-Year-Olds With a History of Expressive Language Delay Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of phonotactic probability on sublexical (phonological) and lexical representations in 3-year-olds who had a history of being late talkers in comparison with their peers with typical language development. Method Ten 3-year-olds who were late talkers and 10 ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2015
The Influence of Phonotactic Probability on Nonword Repetition and Fast Mapping in 3-Year-Olds With a History of Expressive Language Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle MacRoy-Higgins
    Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Kevin Patrick Dalton
    Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Michelle MacRoy-Higgins: mmacroy@hunter.cuny.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Tyler
    Associate Editor: Ann Tyler×
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 2015
The Influence of Phonotactic Probability on Nonword Repetition and Fast Mapping in 3-Year-Olds With a History of Expressive Language Delay
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1773-1779. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0079
History: Received February 23, 2015 , Revised July 2, 2015 , Accepted October 8, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1773-1779. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0079
History: Received February 23, 2015; Revised July 2, 2015; Accepted October 8, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of phonotactic probability on sublexical (phonological) and lexical representations in 3-year-olds who had a history of being late talkers in comparison with their peers with typical language development.

Method Ten 3-year-olds who were late talkers and 10 age-matched typically developing controls completed nonword repetition and fast mapping tasks; stimuli for both experimental procedures differed in phonotactic probability.

Results Both participant groups repeated nonwords containing high phonotactic probability sequences more accurately than nonwords containing low phonotactic probability sequences. Participants with typical language showed an early advantage for fast mapping high phonotactic probability words; children who were late talkers required more exposures to the novel words to show the same advantage for fast mapping high phonotactic probability words.

Conclusions Children who were late talkers showed similar sensitivities to phonotactic probability in nonword repetition and word learning when compared with their peers with no history of language delay. However, word learning in children who were late talkers appeared to be slower when compared with their peers.

Acknowledgment
Thank you to the families for participating in this study.
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