Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain Imaging Investigation of Phonological Awareness and Passage Comprehension Abilities in Adult Recipients of Cochlear Implants Purpose The aim of this study was to examine how the brains of individuals with cochlear implants (CIs) respond to spoken language tasks that underlie successful language acquisition and processing. Method During functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging, CI recipients with hearing impairment (n = 10, mean age: 52.7 ± ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2016
Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain Imaging Investigation of Phonological Awareness and Passage Comprehension Abilities in Adult Recipients of Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Silvia Bisconti
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Masha Shulkin
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Xiaosu Hu
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Gregory J. Basura
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Paul R. Kileny
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Ioulia Kovelman
    Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Silvia Bisconti: bisconti@umich.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Tyler
    Associate Editor: Ann Tyler×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2016
Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain Imaging Investigation of Phonological Awareness and Passage Comprehension Abilities in Adult Recipients of Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 239-253. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0278
History: Received October 2, 2014 , Revised April 8, 2015 , Accepted September 14, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2016, Vol. 59, 239-253. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0278
History: Received October 2, 2014; Revised April 8, 2015; Accepted September 14, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The aim of this study was to examine how the brains of individuals with cochlear implants (CIs) respond to spoken language tasks that underlie successful language acquisition and processing.

Method During functional near-infrared spectroscopy imaging, CI recipients with hearing impairment (n = 10, mean age: 52.7 ± 17.3 years) and controls with normal hearing (n = 10, mean age: 50.6 ± 17.2 years) completed auditory tasks—phonological awareness and passage comprehension—commonly used to investigate neurodevelopmental disorders of language and literacy.

Results The 2 groups had similar reaction time and performance on experimental tasks, although participants with CIs had lower accuracy than controls. Overall, both CI recipients and controls exhibited similar patterns of brain activation during the tasks.

Conclusions The results demonstrate that CI recipients show an overall neurotypical pattern of activation during auditory language tasks on which individuals with neurodevelopmental language learning impairments (e.g., dyslexia) tend to show atypical brain activation. These findings suggest that advancements in functional near-infrared spectroscopy neuroimaging with CI recipients may help shed new light on how varying types of difficulties in language processing affect brain organization for language.

Acknowledgments
We thank the University of Michigan's Center for Human Growth and Development, Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Laboratory, Department of Psychology, and Department of Audiology. We also thank Anthony Natoci and Margaret Ugolini for their help with data collection and Melanie Armstrong, Nicole Confer, and Megan Gomba for their help with document edits.
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