Integration of Partial Information Within and Across Modalities: Contributions to Spoken and Written Sentence Recognition Purpose This study evaluated the extent to which partial spoken or written information facilitates sentence recognition under degraded unimodal and multimodal conditions. Method Twenty young adults with typical hearing completed sentence recognition tasks in unimodal and multimodal conditions across 3 proportions of preservation. In the unimodal condition, performance ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
Integration of Partial Information Within and Across Modalities: Contributions to Spoken and Written Sentence Recognition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly G. Smith
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Daniel Fogerty
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kimberly G. Smith, who is now at the University of South Alabama, Mobile: kimberlysmith@southalabama.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
Integration of Partial Information Within and Across Modalities: Contributions to Spoken and Written Sentence Recognition
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1805-1817. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0272
History: Received September 30, 2014 , Revised April 3, 2015 , Accepted September 17, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1805-1817. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0272
History: Received September 30, 2014; Revised April 3, 2015; Accepted September 17, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study evaluated the extent to which partial spoken or written information facilitates sentence recognition under degraded unimodal and multimodal conditions.

Method Twenty young adults with typical hearing completed sentence recognition tasks in unimodal and multimodal conditions across 3 proportions of preservation. In the unimodal condition, performance was examined when only interrupted text or interrupted speech stimuli were available. In the multimodal condition, performance was examined when both interrupted text and interrupted speech stimuli were concurrently presented. Sentence recognition scores were obtained from simultaneous and delayed response conditions.

Results Significantly better performance was obtained for unimodal speech-only compared with text-only conditions across all proportions preserved. The multimodal condition revealed better performance when responses were delayed. During simultaneous responses, participants received equal benefit from speech information when the text was moderately and significantly degraded. The benefit from text in degraded auditory environments occurred only when speech was highly degraded.

Conclusions The speech signal, compared with text, is robust against degradation likely due to its continuous, versus discrete, features. Allowing time for offline linguistic processing is beneficial for the recognition of partial sensory information in unimodal and multimodal conditions. Despite the perceptual differences between the 2 modalities, the results highlight the utility of multimodal speech + text signals.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported, in part, by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03-DC012506, awarded to Daniel Fogerty.
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