Language Impairment in the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Context Purpose Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a ubiquitous designation that affects the identification, assessment, treatment, and study of pediatric language impairments (LIs). Method Current literature is reviewed in 4 areas: (a) the capacity of psycholinguistic, neuropsychological, and socioemotional behavioral indices to differentiate cases of LI from ADHD; (b) the ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   February 01, 2016
Language Impairment in the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Context
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sean M. Redmond: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
  • Editor: Mabel Rice
    Editor: Mabel Rice×
  • Associate Editor: Mabel Rice
    Associate Editor: Mabel Rice×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: SLI, ADHD, ASD, CI, Bilingualism, and Bidialectism
Research Forum   |   February 01, 2016
Language Impairment in the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Context
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2016, Vol. 59, 133-142. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0038
History: Received January 30, 2015 , Revised March 28, 2015 , Accepted April 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2016, Vol. 59, 133-142. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0038
History: Received January 30, 2015; Revised March 28, 2015; Accepted April 21, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a ubiquitous designation that affects the identification, assessment, treatment, and study of pediatric language impairments (LIs).

Method Current literature is reviewed in 4 areas: (a) the capacity of psycholinguistic, neuropsychological, and socioemotional behavioral indices to differentiate cases of LI from ADHD; (b) the impact of co-occurring ADHD on children's LI; (c) cross-etiology comparisons of the nonlinguistic abilities of children with ADHD and specific LI (SLI); and (d) the extent to which ADHD contributes to educational and health disparities among individuals with LI.

Results Evidence is presented demonstrating the value of using adjusted parent ratings of ADHD symptoms and targeted assessments of children's tense marking, nonword repetition, and sentence recall for differential diagnosis and the identification of comorbidity. Reports suggest that the presence of ADHD does not aggravate children's LI. The potential value of cross-etiology comparisons testing the necessity and sufficiency of proposed nonlinguistic contributors to the etiology of SLI is demonstrated through key studies. Reports suggest that children with comorbid ADHD+LI receive speech-language services at a higher rate than children with SLI.

Conclusion The ADHD context is multifaceted and provides the management and study of LI with both opportunities and obstacles.

Acknowledgments
Funding was provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC011023 (“Co-occurrence of Language and Attention Difficulties in Children”) awarded to the author. This research forum article is based on a symposium presentation by the author at the 2014 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida. Appreciation is extended to Andrea Ash for her comments and suggestions on an earlier draft.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access