The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: I. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on Infant Cry Vocal cry samples of 20 normal newborn infants were recorded under two test conditions: synchronous auditory feedback and a 200 msec delay in auditory feedback (DAF). Averages for cry duration, pause time, and maximum sound pressure level were obtained for 16 of the 20 subjects. An analysis of variance showed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1968
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: I. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on Infant Cry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John K. Cullen, Jr.
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Nancy Fargo
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Richard A. Chase
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Peggy Baker
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1968
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: I. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on Infant Cry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 85-93. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.85
History: Received June 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 85-93. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.85
History: Received June 1, 1967

Vocal cry samples of 20 normal newborn infants were recorded under two test conditions: synchronous auditory feedback and a 200 msec delay in auditory feedback (DAF). Averages for cry duration, pause time, and maximum sound pressure level were obtained for 16 of the 20 subjects. An analysis of variance showed significant effects for cry duration and amplitude (p < 0.05) but not for pause time. Subjects tended to decrease the average duration of cry bursts by more than 100 msec during the DAF test conditions. The resus, while not conclusive, indicate that cry behavior may be under closed-loop auditory feedback control. It is suggested that the auditory monitoring of cry behavior be further investigated by the use of several delay times. If the magnitude and character of changes in crying behavior show consistent variation as a function of delay time, more persuasive evidence for an auditory feedback monitoring system will have been adduced.

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