Hearing in Mice by GSR Audiometry: I. Magnitude of Unconditioned GSR as an Index of Frequency Sensitivity Three experiments show that the magnitude of the unconditioned GSR to tones of equal intensity is largest between 10,000 and 20,000 Hz and is a valid index of the frequency sensitivity of the mouse. These findings agree well with cochlear potential findings and single unit response areas, and suggest that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1968
Hearing in Mice by GSR Audiometry: I. Magnitude of Unconditioned GSR as an Index of Frequency Sensitivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charles I. Berlin
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Alan Gill
    The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Martha Leffler
    The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1968
Hearing in Mice by GSR Audiometry: I. Magnitude of Unconditioned GSR as an Index of Frequency Sensitivity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 159-168. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.159
History: Received August 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 159-168. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.159
History: Received August 1, 1967

Three experiments show that the magnitude of the unconditioned GSR to tones of equal intensity is largest between 10,000 and 20,000 Hz and is a valid index of the frequency sensitivity of the mouse. These findings agree well with cochlear potential findings and single unit response areas, and suggest that the magnitude of the unconditioned GSR might be used as a screening device for frequency sensitivity. A fourth experiment, studying responses of humans to a similar regiment of 100 dB SPL tones, showed a relatively flat response curve unrelated to frequency sensitivity and more closely related to equal loudness contouring. Habituation of the unconditioned GSR in the human was more rapid than in the mouse, suggesting marked differences between the species in either the auditory systems and/or the mechanisms of auditory inhibition and GSR excitation.

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