An Electromyographic Study of Consonant Articulation in Hearing-Impaired and Normal Speakers The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative information on the articulation of some common consonants by a very small sample of normal and deaf talkers. Information on the organization of articulation was collected by electromyography. Electrodes were placed on some diagnostic locations on the facial and tongue musculature, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1968
An Electromyographic Study of Consonant Articulation in Hearing-Impaired and Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dorothy A. Huntington
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
  • Katherine S. Harris
    Haskins Laboratories, New York, New York
  • George N. Sholes
    Haskins Laboratories, New York, New York
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1968
An Electromyographic Study of Consonant Articulation in Hearing-Impaired and Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 147-158. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.147
History: Received September 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 147-158. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.147
History: Received September 1, 1967

The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative information on the articulation of some common consonants by a very small sample of normal and deaf talkers. Information on the organization of articulation was collected by electromyography. Electrodes were placed on some diagnostic locations on the facial and tongue musculature, and the patterns of contractions were measured for 11 common consonants spoken in a disyllabic frame. The results show that patterns of facial muscle contractions in the deaf speakers are in general correct, by comparison with normals, although they are generally exaggerated. On the other hand, tongue muscle patterns of the deaf speakers are stereotyped but frequently wrong, though there is no consistent pattern to the direction of the errors.

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