Consonant Intelligibility: A Procedure for Evaluating Speech in Oral Cleft Subjects Twenty subjects with oral clefts and 10 subjects with normal speech recorded 50-item word lists from the Fairbanks Rhyme Test. A group of 20 untrained listeners responded to the recorded words by transcribing the initial consonant sounds on score sheets which were provided. The results showed that the group of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1968
Consonant Intelligibility: A Procedure for Evaluating Speech in Oral Cleft Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • H. Harlan Bloomer
    The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1968
Consonant Intelligibility: A Procedure for Evaluating Speech in Oral Cleft Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 128-137. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.128
History: Received August 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1968, Vol. 11, 128-137. doi:10.1044/jshr.1101.128
History: Received August 1, 1967

Twenty subjects with oral clefts and 10 subjects with normal speech recorded 50-item word lists from the Fairbanks Rhyme Test. A group of 20 untrained listeners responded to the recorded words by transcribing the initial consonant sounds on score sheets which were provided. The results showed that the group of listeners was reliable in responding to identical tapes on different occasions (r = 0.88) and that listener responses were chiefly a function of the speaker and not the response task. Consonant intelligibility distinguished oral cleft and normal speaking groups on percentage of error scores (12.6 vs. 1.4) and on percentage of nasal-oral consonant confusions (31 vs. 6). A wide range of oral cleft speaker ability was described: percentage of error scores ranged from 2.7 to 23.3, and nasal and oral consonant confusions were more prevalent in the oral cleft speakers with poorer palatopharyngeal valve mechanisms.

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