Oral Perception: III. Texture Discrimination Normative data for oral region texture discrimination are reported. Following a magnitude estimation paradigm, 24 normal speaking subjects assigned smoothness values to stimuli of varying textures after evaluating them with selected oral and non-oral structures. The results suggest characteristic patterns of response for the structures evaluated in relation to the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Oral Perception: III. Texture Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert L. Ringel
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • Hilary M. Fletcher
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • 1 The first report of the series (Ringel and Ewanowski, 1965) included a discussion of the hypothesized importance of sensory monitoring in speech production and the need for a battery of tests that would permit the assessment of oral sensory system functioning and also dealt in detail with the problem of “Two-Point Discrimination.” The second paper in the series (Ringel, Saxman, and Brooks, 1967) dealt with “Mandibular Kinesthesia.”
    The first report of the series (Ringel and Ewanowski, 1965) included a discussion of the hypothesized importance of sensory monitoring in speech production and the need for a battery of tests that would permit the assessment of oral sensory system functioning and also dealt in detail with the problem of “Two-Point Discrimination.” The second paper in the series (Ringel, Saxman, and Brooks, 1967) dealt with “Mandibular Kinesthesia.”×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Oral Perception: III. Texture Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 642-649. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.642
History: Received March 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 642-649. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.642
History: Received March 1, 1967

Normative data for oral region texture discrimination are reported. Following a magnitude estimation paradigm, 24 normal speaking subjects assigned smoothness values to stimuli of varying textures after evaluating them with selected oral and non-oral structures. The results suggest characteristic patterns of response for the structures evaluated in relation to the texture of the stimuli and power function exponents representative of these patterns were determined. The data suggest certain limits on the texture judgment capabilities of the structures studied.

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