Lingual Pressures Associated with Alveolar Consonants Measures of lingual pressures which occurred during syllable utterances by 10 young adults were recorded superior and lingual to the left and right maxillary first molars and central incisors by strain gauge pressure transducers. These recordings were obtained during fast and slow utterance rates of selected consonant-vowel and vowel-consonant syllables. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Lingual Pressures Associated with Alveolar Consonants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert E. McGlone
    State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
  • William R. Proffit
    University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington, Kentucky
  • Richard L. Christiansen
    National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, Maryland
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Lingual Pressures Associated with Alveolar Consonants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 606-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.606
History: Received January 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 606-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.606
History: Received January 1, 1967

Measures of lingual pressures which occurred during syllable utterances by 10 young adults were recorded superior and lingual to the left and right maxillary first molars and central incisors by strain gauge pressure transducers. These recordings were obtained during fast and slow utterance rates of selected consonant-vowel and vowel-consonant syllables. Measurement of these recordings showed: (1) mean peak lingual pressure varied depending upon the consonant and its position in the syllable; (2) peak pressures obtained from the molar region were less variable and generally greater than found in the central incisor region; (3) integrated time pressure values for entire syllables showed no appreciable difference at different transducer positions; and (4) greater integrated time pressure measures as well as greater variability was found for syllables repeated rapidly compared to slower utterances.

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