Phrase-Learning in Deaf and Hearing Subjects Two groups each containing 24 deaf subjects were compared with 24 fifth graders and 24 twelfth graders with normal hearing on the learning of segments of written English. Eight subjects from each group learned phrasally defined segments such as “paid the tall lady,” eight more learned the same words in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Phrase-Learning in Deaf and Hearing Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Penelope B. Odom
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Richard L. Blanton
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Phrase-Learning in Deaf and Hearing Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 600-605. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.600
History: Received April 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 600-605. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.600
History: Received April 1, 1967

Two groups each containing 24 deaf subjects were compared with 24 fifth graders and 24 twelfth graders with normal hearing on the learning of segments of written English. Eight subjects from each group learned phrasally defined segments such as “paid the tall lady,” eight more learned the same words in nonphrases having acceptable English word order such as “lady paid the tall,” and the remaining eight in each group learned the same words scrambled, “lady tall the paid.” The task consisted of 12 study-test trials. Analyses of the mean number of words recalled correctly and the probability of recalling the whole phrase correctly, given that one word of it was recalled, indicated that both ages of hearing subjects showed facilitation on the phrasally defined segments, interference on the scrambled segments. The deaf groups showed no differential recall as a function of phrasal structure. It was concluded that the deaf do not possess the same perceptual or memory processes with regard to English as do the hearing subjects.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access