Verbal and Extraverbal Components of Language as Related to Lateralized Brain Damage Twelve patients with left cerebral hemisphere lesions and 12 with right hemisphere lesions chose, from among four alternatives, the word that was identical in spelling to a sample word (verbal or extraverbal components sufficient to perform task at this level), and chose a synonym of the sample word from among ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Verbal and Extraverbal Components of Language as Related to Lateralized Brain Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert J. Bonkowski
    Harbor General Hospital, Torrance, California
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Verbal and Extraverbal Components of Language as Related to Lateralized Brain Damage
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 558-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.564
History: Received December 1, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 558-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.564
History: Received December 1, 1966

Twelve patients with left cerebral hemisphere lesions and 12 with right hemisphere lesions chose, from among four alternatives, the word that was identical in spelling to a sample word (verbal or extraverbal components sufficient to perform task at this level), and chose a synonym of the sample word from among four alternatives (verbal component necessary). The words were presented in unimodal and cross-modal conditions. In the unimodal conditions sample words and alternatives were presented in the same modality (aural or visual); in the cross-modal conditions the sample word was presented in one modality (A or V) and the alternatives in the opposite modality (V or A). The subject responded by pushing a button when he perceived the correct choice.

Patients with right-sided lesions had significantly greater response times, and more errors, than patients with left-sided lesions on those items in which the extraverbal component was crucial to successful performance. The converse was true on those items that called for greater facility with the verbal component of language. There were no significant differences between unimodal and cross-modal tasks.

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