Head Position Identification A binaural recording of traffic sounds that reached an artificial head oriented in five different positions was presented to five subjects, each of whom responded under four different criteria. The results showed that it is possible to examine the ability of listeners to localize sound while listening through earphones and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Head Position Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. N. Wright
    Differential Psychoacoustic Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Head Position Identification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 438-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.438
History: Received December 1, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 438-448. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.438
History: Received December 1, 1966

A binaural recording of traffic sounds that reached an artificial head oriented in five different positions was presented to five subjects, each of whom responded under four different criteria. The results showed that it is possible to examine the ability of listeners to localize sound while listening through earphones and that the criterion adopted by an individual listener is independent of his performance. For the experimental conditions used, the Type II ROC curve generated by manipulating criterion behavior was linear and consistent with a guessing model. Further experiments involving different degrees of stimulus degradation suggested a partial explanation for this finding and illustrated the various types of monaural and binaural cues used by normal and hearing-impaired listeners to localize complex sounds.

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