Factors Related to the Effectiveness of Articulation Therapy for Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade Children Articulation therapy was administered by 20 speech clinicians to 288 children in a suburban school system. Articulation testing was completed both before and after an eight-and-a-half month treatment period. Therapy was found effective for all groups regardless of grade level or severity. However, subjects with poor stimulability scores derived significantly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Factors Related to the Effectiveness of Articulation Therapy for Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald K. Sommers
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Robert H. Leiss
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Mary Ann Delp
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Adele J. Gerber
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Dolores Fundrella
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Richard M. Smith, II
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Mary V. Revucky
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Dorothy Ellis
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
  • Virginia A. Haley
    Montgomery County Schools, Norristown, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Factors Related to the Effectiveness of Articulation Therapy for Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 428-437. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.428
History: Received December 1, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 428-437. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.428
History: Received December 1, 1966

Articulation therapy was administered by 20 speech clinicians to 288 children in a suburban school system. Articulation testing was completed both before and after an eight-and-a-half month treatment period. Therapy was found effective for all groups regardless of grade level or severity. However, subjects with poor stimulability scores derived significantly more benefits from therapy than did those having good stimulability scores. Stimulability performances were related to articulation improvements in untreated groups at certain grade levels. Compared with subjects having milder degrees of defectiveness, subjects with more severe problems improved more in kindergarten than at the second grade level.

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