Frequency, Duration, and Perceptual Measures in Relation to Judgments of Alaryngeal Speech Acceptability Thirty-three recordings of laryngectomized speakers reading a standard passage were subjected to two separate perceptual evaluations and to fundamental frequency and durational analysis. Factors related to higher speech acceptability ratings include: (1) a rapid rate of speech production, (2) little perception of respiratory noise, and (3) a relatively higher mean ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1967
Frequency, Duration, and Perceptual Measures in Relation to Judgments of Alaryngeal Speech Acceptability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Shipp
    Veterans Administration Hospital, San Francisco, California
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1967
Frequency, Duration, and Perceptual Measures in Relation to Judgments of Alaryngeal Speech Acceptability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 417-427. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.417
History: Received December 1, 1966
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1967, Vol. 10, 417-427. doi:10.1044/jshr.1003.417
History: Received December 1, 1966

Thirty-three recordings of laryngectomized speakers reading a standard passage were subjected to two separate perceptual evaluations and to fundamental frequency and durational analysis. Factors related to higher speech acceptability ratings include: (1) a rapid rate of speech production, (2) little perception of respiratory noise, and (3) a relatively higher mean fundamental frequency. The most invariant of the factors measured were respiratory noise prominence and fundamental frequency SD. It was apparent that naive listeners tended to rate alaryngeal speakers higher as the speaker approached the norms for normal laryngeal speakers.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access