Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology Purpose The authors discuss the rationale behind the term laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy to describe the application of high-speed endoscopic imaging techniques to the visualization of vocal fold vibration. Method Commentary on the advantages of using accurate and consistent terminology in the field of voice research is provided. Specific ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   October 01, 2015
Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dimitar D. Deliyski
    Communication Sciences Research Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Daryush D. Mehta: daryush.mehta@alum.mit.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   October 01, 2015
Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1488-1492. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0253
History: Received September 10, 2014 , Revised February 25, 2015 , Accepted June 9, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1488-1492. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0253
History: Received September 10, 2014; Revised February 25, 2015; Accepted June 9, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The authors discuss the rationale behind the term laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy to describe the application of high-speed endoscopic imaging techniques to the visualization of vocal fold vibration.

Method Commentary on the advantages of using accurate and consistent terminology in the field of voice research is provided. Specific justification is described for each component of the term high-speed videoendoscopy, which is compared and contrasted with alternative terminologies in the literature.

Results In addition to the ubiquitous high-speed descriptor, the term endoscopy is necessary to specify the appropriate imaging technology and distinguish among modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nonendoscopic optical imaging. Furthermore, the term video critically indicates the electronic recording of a sequence of optical still images representing scenes in motion, in contrast to strobed images using high-speed photography and non-optical high-speed magnetic resonance imaging. High-speed videoendoscopy thus concisely describes the technology and can be appended by the desired anatomical nomenclature such as laryngeal.

Conclusions Laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy strikes a balance between conciseness and specificity when referring to the typical high-speed imaging method performed on human participants. Guidance for the creation of future terminology provides clarity and context for current and future experiments and the dissemination of results among researchers.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01 DC007640), awarded to Dimitar D. Deliyski, and by the Voice Health Institute. The article's contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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