An Open Conversation on Using Eye-Gaze Methods in Studies of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Purpose Eye-gaze methods have the potential to advance the study of neurodevelopmental disorders. Despite their increasing use, challenges arise in using these methods with individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and in reporting sufficient methodological detail such that the resulting research is replicable and interpretable. Method This tutorial presents key ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   December 01, 2015
An Open Conversation on Using Eye-Gaze Methods in Studies of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney E. Venker
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Sara T. Kover
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Courtney E. Venker: cgerickson@wisc.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Linda Watson
    Associate Editor: Linda Watson×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Language / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   December 01, 2015
An Open Conversation on Using Eye-Gaze Methods in Studies of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1719-1732. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0304
History: Received October 28, 2014 , Revised March 19, 2015 , Accepted July 27, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, 1719-1732. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0304
History: Received October 28, 2014; Revised March 19, 2015; Accepted July 27, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose Eye-gaze methods have the potential to advance the study of neurodevelopmental disorders. Despite their increasing use, challenges arise in using these methods with individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and in reporting sufficient methodological detail such that the resulting research is replicable and interpretable.

Method This tutorial presents key considerations involved in designing and conducting eye-gaze studies for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and proposes conventions for reporting the results of such studies.

Results Methodological decisions (e.g., whether to use automated eye tracking or manual coding, implementing strategies to scaffold children's performance, defining valid trials) have cascading effects on the conclusions drawn from eye-gaze data. Research reports that include specific information about procedures, missing data, and selection of participants will facilitate interpretation and replication.

Conclusions Eye-gaze methods provide exciting opportunities for studying neurodevelopmental disorders. Open discussion of the issues presented in this tutorial will improve the pace of productivity and the impact of advances in research on neurodevelopmental disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant F31DC012451 (awarded to Courtney E. Venker), Grant F31DC010959 (awarded to Sara T. Kover), Grant R01DC012513 (awarded to Susan Ellis Weismer), and Grant P30HD003352 (awarded to Marsha Mailick) as well as a Student and Early Career Council Dissertation Funding Award from the Society for Research in Child Development and a Dissertation Research Award from the American Psychological Association (both awarded to Sara T. Kover). Thanks to Paul Yoder and Rob Olson for providing comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. We thank our mentors for providing us with the opportunity to access and learn about eye-gaze methodologies and our lab-mates for helping us brainstorm and problem-solve. Most of all, we gratefully acknowledge the children and families who participated in our eye-gaze studies and from whom we learned so much.
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