Developing Brain Injury Interventions on Both Ends of the Treatment Continuum Depends Upon Early Research Partnerships and Feasibility Studies Purpose The purpose of this research article is to describe two very different lines of brain injury treatment research, both of which illuminate the benefits of implementation science. Method The article first describes the development and pilot of a computerized cognitive intervention and highlights how adherence to implementation ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   December 01, 2015
Developing Brain Injury Interventions on Both Ends of the Treatment Continuum Depends Upon Early Research Partnerships and Feasibility Studies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • McKay Moore Sohlberg
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Priya Kucheria
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Stephen Fickas
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Shari L. Wade
    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to McKay Moore Sohlberg: mckay@uoregon.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor and Associate Editor: Rhea Paul×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Implementation Science
Supplement Article   |   December 01, 2015
Developing Brain Injury Interventions on Both Ends of the Treatment Continuum Depends Upon Early Research Partnerships and Feasibility Studies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, S1864-S1870. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0150
History: Received April 23, 2015 , Accepted May 26, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2015, Vol. 58, S1864-S1870. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-15-0150
History: Received April 23, 2015; Accepted May 26, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this research article is to describe two very different lines of brain injury treatment research, both of which illuminate the benefits of implementation science.

Method The article first describes the development and pilot of a computerized cognitive intervention and highlights how adherence to implementation science principles improved the design of the intervention. Second, the article describes the application of implementation science to the development of assistive technology for cognition.

Results The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR; Damschroder et al., 2009) and the menu of implementation research strategies by Powell et al. (2012)  provide a roadmap for cognitive rehabilitation researchers to attend to factors in the implementation climate that can improve the development, usability, and adoptability of new treatment methods.

Conclusion Attention to implementation science research principles has increased the feasibility and efficacy of both impairment-based cognitive rehabilitation programs and assistive technology for cognition.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge support by the Department of Education's National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Grant H133B090010-10.
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