Language Ability Groups in Bilingual Children: A Latent Profile Analysis Purpose Classifying children into two language ability groups, with and without language impairment, may underestimate the number of groups with distinct language ability patterns, or, alternatively, there may be only a single group characterized by a continuum of language performance. The purpose of the current study was to identify the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2015
Language Ability Groups in Bilingual Children: A Latent Profile Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Kapantzoglou
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • M. Adelaida Restrepo
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Shelley Gray
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Marilyn S. Thompson
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Maria Kapantzoglou, who is now at Portland State University: mkapa2@pdx.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Margarita Kaushanskaya
    Associate Editor: Margarita Kaushanskaya×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2015
Language Ability Groups in Bilingual Children: A Latent Profile Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1549-1562. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0290
History: Received October 17, 2014 , Revised March 3, 2015 , Accepted July 14, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1549-1562. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0290
History: Received October 17, 2014; Revised March 3, 2015; Accepted July 14, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Classifying children into two language ability groups, with and without language impairment, may underestimate the number of groups with distinct language ability patterns, or, alternatively, there may be only a single group characterized by a continuum of language performance. The purpose of the current study was to identify the number and characteristics of latent (unobservable) language ability groups in an unclassified sample of predominantly Spanish-speaking children.

Method An unclassified sample of 431 predominantly Spanish-speaking 5- to 7-year-olds learning English participated in the study. The groups were identified on the basis of (a) language sample analyses (semantic, grammatical, and sentence-length measures); (b) language processing tasks (phonological working memory and processing speed measures); and (c) nonverbal cognitive abilities assessed using a standardized measure. All tasks were administered in Spanish. Latent profile analysis was used to examine the number and nature of distinct language ability groups in the unclassified sample.

Results Results indicated that a three-group model best represented the data, characterized by low grammaticality in one group, low phonological working memory in another group, and average skills in a third group.

Conclusion Classifying children into two groups, those with and without language impairment, may lead to misidentification of language impairment.

Acknowledgment
The research in this article was supported by Grant R324A080024 from the Institute of Education Sciences: Spanish Screener for Language Impairments in Children, Washington, DC (M. Adelaida Restrepo).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access