Comparison of Vocal Vibration-Dose Measures for Potential-Damage Risk Criteria Purpose Schoolteachers have become a benchmark population for the study of occupational voice use. A decade of vibration-dose studies on the teacher population allows a comparison to be made between specific dose measures for eventual assessment of damage risk. Method Vibration dosimetry is reformulated with the inclusion of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2015
Comparison of Vocal Vibration-Dose Measures for Potential-Damage Risk Criteria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ingo R. Titze
    National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Eric J. Hunter
    National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ingo R. Titze: ingo.titze@ncvs2.org
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt
    Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2015
Comparison of Vocal Vibration-Dose Measures for Potential-Damage Risk Criteria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1425-1439. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-13-0128
History: Received May 21, 2013 , Revised January 24, 2014 , Accepted June 23, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1425-1439. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-13-0128
History: Received May 21, 2013; Revised January 24, 2014; Accepted June 23, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose Schoolteachers have become a benchmark population for the study of occupational voice use. A decade of vibration-dose studies on the teacher population allows a comparison to be made between specific dose measures for eventual assessment of damage risk.

Method Vibration dosimetry is reformulated with the inclusion of collision stress. Two methods of estimating amplitude of vocal-fold vibration are compared to capture variations in vocal intensity. Energy loss from collision is added to the energy-dissipation dose. An equal-energy-dissipation criterion is defined and used on the teacher corpus as a potential-damage risk criterion.

Results Comparison of time-, cycle-, distance-, and energy-dose calculations for 57 teachers reveals a progression in information content in the ability to capture variations in duration, speaking pitch, and vocal intensity. The energy-dissipation dose carries the greatest promise in capturing excessive tissue stress and collision but also the greatest liability, due to uncertainty in parameters. Cycle dose is least correlated with the other doses.

Conclusion As a first guide to damage risk in excessive voice use, the equal-energy-dissipation dose criterion can be used to structure trade-off relations between loudness, adduction, and duration of speech.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R01 DC004224, awarded to Ingo R. Titze, Principal Investigator. The authors would like to thank the research team (both past and present) at the National Center for Voice and Speech, with many supporting roles (Dosimeter Team: Jan Švec, Peter Popolo, Karen Rogge-Miller, Andrew Starr, Albert Worley, and Anil Palaparthi). Thanks also to Simone Graetzer for her statistical expertise.
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