Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency Via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals With Voice Disorders Purpose This study investigated the use of neck-skin acceleration for relative fundamental frequency (RFF) analysis. Method Forty individuals with voice disorders associated with vocal hyperfunction and 20 age- and sex-matched control participants were recorded with a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer and a microphone while producing speech stimuli appropriate for ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2015
Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency Via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals With Voice Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yu-An S. Lien
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Carolyn R. Calabrese
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Carolyn M. Michener
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Elizabeth Heller Murray
    Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • J. Pieter Noordzij
    Boston University, Boston, MA
    Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Boston University, Boston, MA
    Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial relationship with Pentax Medical with respect to the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor.
    Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial relationship with Pentax Medical with respect to the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor. ×
  • Correspondence to Cara E. Stepp: cstepp@bu.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt
    Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 2015
Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency Via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals With Voice Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1482-1487. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-15-0126
History: Received April 4, 2015 , Accepted June 25, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2015, Vol. 58, 1482-1487. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-15-0126
History: Received April 4, 2015; Accepted June 25, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study investigated the use of neck-skin acceleration for relative fundamental frequency (RFF) analysis.

Method Forty individuals with voice disorders associated with vocal hyperfunction and 20 age- and sex-matched control participants were recorded with a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer and a microphone while producing speech stimuli appropriate for RFF. Rater reliabilities, RFF means, and RFF standard deviations derived from the accelerometer were compared with those derived from the microphone.

Results RFF estimated from the accelerometer had slightly higher intrarater reliability and identical interrater reliability compared with values estimated with the microphone. Although sensor type and the Vocal Cycle × Sensor and Vocal Cycle × Sensor × Group interactions showed significant effects on RFF means, the typical RFF pattern could be derived from either sensor. For both sensors, the RFF of individuals with vocal hyperfunction was lower than that of the controls. Sensor type and its interactions did not have significant effects on RFF standard deviations.

Conclusions RFF can be reliably estimated using an accelerometer, but these values cannot be compared with those collected via microphone. Future studies are needed to determine the physiological basis of RFF and examine the effect of sensors on RFF in practical voice assessment and monitoring settings.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants DC012651 (awarded to Cara E. Stepp) and DC011588 (awarded to Robert E. Hillman) and a New Century Scholars Research Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (awarded to Cara E. Stepp). Thanks to Defne Abur, Christina Stevens, and Alexandra Martinson for assistance with data recording and to Melissa Cooke, Amanda Fryd, and Molly Bresnahan for help with recording segmentation. We disclose that author Robert E. Hillman has a financial relationship with Pentax Medical with respect to the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor.
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