Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults With Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function Purpose This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function. Method Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20–38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42–64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2015
Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults With Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rafidah Mazlan
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
  • Joseph Kei
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Cheng Li Ya
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
  • Wan Nur Hanim Mohd Yusof
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
  • Lokman Saim
    Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
  • Fei Zhao
    University of Bristol, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rafidah Mazlan: rmazlan@gmail.com
  • Fei Zhao is now at the Centre for Speech-Language Therapy and Hearing Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales.
    Fei Zhao is now at the Centre for Speech-Language Therapy and Hearing Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales.×
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts
    Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2015
Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults With Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2015, Vol. 58, 1377-1386. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0199
History: Received July 22, 2014 , Revised April 14, 2015 , Accepted June 19, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2015, Vol. 58, 1377-1386. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0199
History: Received July 22, 2014; Revised April 14, 2015; Accepted June 19, 2015

Purpose This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function.

Method Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20–38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42–64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, 10 women, aged 65–82 years) were assessed. Energy absorbance (EA) data were collected at 30 frequencies using a prototype commercial instrument developed by Interacoustics.

Results Results showed that the young adult group had significantly lower EA (between 400 and 560 Hz) than the middle-aged group. However, the middle-aged group showed significantly lower EA (between 2240 and 5040 Hz) than the young adult group. In addition, the older adult group had significantly lower EA than the young adult group (between 2520 and 5040 Hz). No significant difference in EA was found at any frequency between middle-aged and older adults. Across age groups, gender differences were found with men having significantly higher EA values than women at lower frequencies, whereas women had significantly higher EA at higher frequencies.

Conclusions This study provides evidence of the influence of gender and age on EA in adults with normal outer and middle ear function. These findings support the importance of establishing age- and gender-specific EA norms for the adult population.

Acknowledgments
This work was financially supported by the Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) from the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM-NN-03-FRGS0040-2010) to the first author. The authors gratefully acknowledge the participation of all research participants in this study.
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